Blogs

More Investigations in Seal Cove

It has been a flurry of activity in Seal Cove. We mapped the entire wreck with the exception of a timber that we will record tomorrow. We had volunteers lending a hand all week. As many as nine at a time. It has been a success as an outreach project, with several people having their first experience in maritime archaeology on the wreck. Volunteers learned trilateration, baseline offsets, drew profiles, measured frames and photographed fasteners. I gave a talk on maritime archaeology at the Schoodic Education and Research Center Wednesday night.

Site mapping in Seal Cove

We are well underway here in Maine, mapping the Seal Cove wreck. Placing a non-intrusive baseline proved problematic, but we were lucky to have two large boulders nearby to tie into. Since the wreck is in the intertidal zone, we can only work when the tide lets us. Each day has seen two shifts of mapping and numerous volunteers, from Acadia National Park staff to members of the local community. We have both east and west sides of the vessel mapped from zero to 38 feet. So far the most intriguing feature is the use of treenails, or wooden pegs, to hold the outer hull planking to the frames.

Seal Cove Shipwreck Project: volunteer!

As part of the Seal Cove Shipwreck Project we are going to be recording a shipwreck in the intertidal zone in Seal Cove, Maine, August 1-5. This is an IMH project in conjunction with Acadia National Park. Learn the basics for mapping and documenting a wreck site by working with maritime archaeologists.

Success at St.Augustine!!

IMH's boat Roper assisted the St.Augustine Lighthouse & Museum in a month-long field school, which was climaxed on 28 June by successfully raising two guns off a late 18th or early 19th century wreck.  News article and video at http://m.jacksonville.com/news/metro/2011-06-28/story/shipwreck-yields-c...

Maryland Archaeology Workshop and Middle Atlantic Archaeological Conference

On Saturday, 12 March, the Maryland Historical Trust will hold its annual workshop at 100 Community Place, Crownsville MD 21032.  IMH will participate and present.  The program is attached.

A week later, 19 March, the Middle Atlantic Archaeological Conference will be held at Ocean City MD.  See http://www.maacmidatlanticarchaeology.org/2011conference.htm  We will present there too!

2011 schedule, revised again

Field work will start on 21 February, and we have added some items to the list.  The updated schedule is attached.  Dust off and tune up your dive gear, folks -- this will be a very busy year.

Autumn 2011 plans

We are contemplating a massive reconnaissance project to run from18  August to 10 November 2011, to investigate a long list of targets (372 at current count) in the Chesapeake and Delaware Bays and off Cape Henlopen.  A draft project plan is attached as a .pdf file.

The idea is to start when Roper returns from her summer soujourn at St. Augustine, and to finish in time to pull the U-1105 buoy on 12-13 November for the winter.  "We are ready now ... as soon as we refuel."

new boat

The new-to-us skiff is operational and legal.  She will work in shallow waters and decent weather, and can handle four divers with gear -- maybe six at most.  26 feet, 20+ knots, 1970 Pacemaker "Alglas" hull, 1996 Chevy 350 engine (straight inboard), center console, extra fuel tanks, all USCG-required gear, VHF, WAAS DGPS, &c.

She needs a name.  Suggestions?

Kojo Nnamdi Show, Monday 10/25/10

IMH and our Mount Vernon project were featured today on the Kojo Nnamdi Show on WAMU (88.5 FM).  For a transcript go to http://thekojonnamdishow.org/ for 10/25/10, and click on Listen under Underwater Archaeology.

 

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