IMH Projects

Dunmore reprise

During the fall and winter of 2014 and spring of 2015 we will resume our search for any remains of Lord Dunmore's "Floating City" from 1776.  See attached summary.

2014 fieldwork plans, updated

IMH's field projects for 2014 include the following --

1    Help Scott Tucker assess a 1680s site (done)
2    Search for eight sites in St Mary's River for Maryland Historical Trust (July)
2a  Inspect a storm anchor in St Mary's River, Maryland (July)
3    Assess a dozen WWI wooden steamers at Widewater, Virginia (September - October)
3a  Assess 14 Pootomac sites en route to Widewater (September)
4    Continue mapping Civil War wrecks at Quantico, Virginia (October)

Kingstown Harbor Shipwreck Project

From December 10, 1997, to January 10, 1998, IMH conducted a detailed survey of a historic shipwreck in Kingstown Harbor with the assistance of the Academic Diving Program at Florida State University. The Organization of American States and the government of St. Vincent and the Grenadines supported the expedition to explore and document the archaeological site. This report briefly summarizes the activities of the survey team during the month-long period of examination. During that time, the team collected a significant amount of information regarding the archaeological nature of the site.

2014 fieldwork plans

From the Chesapeake to St. Augustine, again

See attached .pdf

Seal Cove Shipwreck Project

Figure 1: Seal Cove Shipwreck Site Plan.Figure 1: Seal Cove Shipwreck Site Plan.The Seal Cove Shipwreck Project, funded by the National Park Service’s Submerged Resources Center and the Institute for Maritime History, recorded archaeologically a historic wooden shipwreck on Mount Desert Island, Maine. Situated in the inter-tidal zone on Acadia National Park easement land owned by the Town of Tremont, the wreck was surveyed between July 30 and August 6, 2011.

Wooden pegs and Volunteers

Only late yesterday did we discover any definite fasteners on top of the keel. Attached is a close-up of a wooden peg, or treenail, in the center at the top of the keel. We only found two of them, both at the northern end of the vessel. Perhaps they attached a stem or sternpost.

More Investigations in Seal Cove

It has been a flurry of activity in Seal Cove. We mapped the entire wreck with the exception of a timber that we will record tomorrow. We had volunteers lending a hand all week. As many as nine at a time. It has been a success as an outreach project, with several people having their first experience in maritime archaeology on the wreck. Volunteers learned trilateration, baseline offsets, drew profiles, measured frames and photographed fasteners. I gave a talk on maritime archaeology at the Schoodic Education and Research Center Wednesday night.

Seal Cove Shipwreck Project: volunteer!

As part of the Seal Cove Shipwreck Project we are going to be recording a shipwreck in the intertidal zone in Seal Cove, Maine, August 1-5. This is an IMH project in conjunction with Acadia National Park. Learn the basics for mapping and documenting a wreck site by working with maritime archaeologists.

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